antidepressants

when depression hits and doesn’t go away, sometimes it makes sense to take antidepressants.

medline has a helpful little article about antidepressants, giving a very quick overview over how they work, what types of antidepressants are available, how to stop taking them, etc.

i found this information to be the most useful:

be patient when working with your doctor. it often takes several tries to find the right antidepressant. a doctor will select the most appropriate antidepressant based on your symptoms, the antidepressant’s potential side effects, your medical conditions and any medications you’re taking. because of the many antidepressants on the market today, doctors have many options to choose from. so don’t worry if the first antidepressant is not working well for you.

antidepressants are not a quick fix and take time to work. they often take several weeks (or more) before positive results are noticed. because everyone’s brain chemistry is different, antidepressants will affect individuals differently.

each antidepressant will have its own particular side effects. many side effects are temporary and will go away once your body adjusts to the medication. ask your doctor about the typical side effects, how long they may last and when you should contact your doctor.

the only problem with this information is that it depicts an ideal situation. the not-so-ideal reality is sometimes that experimenting with different drugs until you get the right one requires exactly the type of motivation and determination you don’t have when you’re so depressed that you need antidepressants. which is one of the reasons why it is so crucial that you have a doctor or nurse-practitioner with whom you have a close and positive working relationship that will make such a problem much easier to deal with.

antidepressants, by the way, are also used for anxiety, panic attacks, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and chronic pain.

antidepressants (and other psychoactive drugs) are obviously not like tylenol or pepto bismol; they are very powerful. often, this can be felt on all levels: mentally, emotionally, physically, even spiritually. that’s why it might be a good idea to first try other avenues, such as therapy, yoga, and meditation. the side effects of these are often pleasant instead of unpleasant! even when taking medication, it has been shown that it works better in connection with therapy.

isabella mori
moritherapy
counselling in vancouver

2 thoughts on “antidepressants

  1. rick

    Hi. Stumbled across this place.

    Lived with it most of my life. Diagnosed about 5 years ago. Fell into the big valley by accident in the 80s, saw that it was heaven and hell together.

    Nine years later walked out of the emotional valley. 15 more and I fell into the practical one. I had solved my world, but had not reconciled my place in “the” world. Discovered I didn’t really have one that wasn’t fabricated, so I walked away from all my roles.

    They prescribed Zoloft. Took one and knew it wasn’t going to let me wander in the valley, no matter how hard I tried to descend. Never took another. No feelings = no answers.

    Gave up. No work, no dreams, no motives. Found the limit of non-involvement, short of self-harm. Nothing there. Making my way back out, with a better sense of self, but the world is awfully dysfunctional and somnambulant. Both my daughters on meds now. I tried hard to show them what I found, but in the end everyone walks it on their own, however they can.

    There are no revealed mysteries in micrograins of medicine. I know how unpopular this opinion can be, but the 40 days in the desert are not to be avoided if the secrets are to be revealed. It may not be for you, reader, and I do not advocate ignoring your doctor. You have to be deep and resilient and stubborn and intuitive and relentlessly analytical to do it on your own, while you walk through the valley of the shadow of life.

    I simply had to recapitulate my existence in order to become anything close to free and I had to do it without buffers. It has been hard, but revelatory beyond description. I am still as alone as ever, and more, but that’s the way of it. I help those I can when they are able to hear. That much is good.

    This may not suit your space. Nonetheless, I wish you well. Just felt like typing.

  2. rick

    Hi. Stumbled across this place.

    Lived with it most of my life. Diagnosed about 5 years ago. Fell into the big valley by accident in the 80s, saw that it was heaven and hell together.

    Nine years later walked out of the emotional valley. 15 more and I fell into the practical one. I had solved my world, but had not reconciled my place in “the” world. Discovered I didn’t really have one that wasn’t fabricated, so I walked away from all my roles.

    They prescribed Zoloft. Took one and knew it wasn’t going to let me wander in the valley, no matter how hard I tried to descend. Never took another. No feelings = no answers.

    Gave up. No work, no dreams, no motives. Found the limit of non-involvement, short of self-harm. Nothing there. Making my way back out, with a better sense of self, but the world is awfully dysfunctional and somnambulant. Both my daughters on meds now. I tried hard to show them what I found, but in the end everyone walks it on their own, however they can.

    There are no revealed mysteries in micrograins of medicine. I know how unpopular this opinion can be, but the 40 days in the desert are not to be avoided if the secrets are to be revealed. It may not be for you, reader, and I do not advocate ignoring your doctor. You have to be deep and resilient and stubborn and intuitive and relentlessly analytical to do it on your own, while you walk through the valley of the shadow of life.

    I simply had to recapitulate my existence in order to become anything close to free and I had to do it without buffers. It has been hard, but revelatory beyond description. I am still as alone as ever, and more, but that’s the way of it. I help those I can when they are able to hear. That much is good.

    This may not suit your space. Nonetheless, I wish you well. Just felt like typing.

  3. Pingback: through the valley of depression » change therapy - isabella mori

  4. Pingback: through the valley of depression » change therapy - isabella mori

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