nutrigenomics, diet and obesity

in continuation of a post the other day on the need to respect individuality in therapy, i came across toronto nutritional sciences researcher ahmed el-sohemy’s work on the difference between men and women in reacting to caffeine.

nutrigenomics – matching nutrition to your DNA

his research is connected to the field of nutrigenomics, a new field of study that eventually hopes to match optimal diets to a person’s unique DNA make-up.

this is very important work. for example, jose cordovas, a researcher at the US department of agriculture found that there may just be a genetic reason for why some people can eat tons of cheese cake and still hardly gain any weight.

nutrigenomics and weight gain

this proves hopeful also, of course, for people who have the opposite problem – they just look at a sliver of donut and already they need a bigger size bathing suit! medical professionals would often dismiss this, saying that all one needs to do is reduce caloric intake – now it looks like it’s a little more complicated than that.

i’ve always suspected that, particularly since my study on the widely differing reactions to pain medication by people afflicted with reflex sympathetic dystrophy (“RSD”, now usually referred to CRPS or chronic regional pain syndrome). our body chemistry is such an immensely complicated system and it just doesn’t make sense that it would be the same for everyone.

metabolomics – your individual metabolism blueprint

nutrigenomics and metabolomics, a related field that examines the unique interaction of genotype and phenotype by mapping cell metabolites, are very new, and for now, attempts to use any knowledge gained in the studies are extremely experimental at best. however, i hope that in the future we will be able to apply this knowledge to help people with stubborn weight problems as well as food allergies.

in the meantime, figure out what your favourite veggies are and eat them in abundance!

(this post has been included in a blog carnival over at middle age shed

isabella mori
moritherapy
counselling in vancouver

8 thoughts on “nutrigenomics, diet and obesity

  1. Rachel Dechenne

    Hi Isabella,

    I did some research on nutrigenomics developments trajectories and what this new platform of knowledge might bring (risk/benefit) to individuals as well as group of people in different culture.

    The potential as you rightly underlined is huge but as for many innovations the question remains who is driving the developments?

    Well done, anyway for your well-balanced note on this delicate subject. I love your last line.

    For more on my views, links etc. you are most welcomed to come and check out my blog at http://rachelcdechenne.blogspot.com/

    Good luck with your nice work!

    Cheers,

    Rachel

  2. Rachel Dechenne

    Hi Isabella,

    I did some research on nutrigenomics developments trajectories and what this new platform of knowledge might bring (risk/benefit) to individuals as well as group of people in different culture.

    The potential as you rightly underlined is huge but as for many innovations the question remains who is driving the developments?

    Well done, anyway for your well-balanced note on this delicate subject. I love your last line.

    For more on my views, links etc. you are most welcomed to come and check out my blog at http://rachelcdechenne.blogspot.com/

    Good luck with your nice work!

    Cheers,

    Rachel

  3. Emi

    I’m reading a lot about these subjects and always wondering what is the deal with my body. I suspect nutrigenomics and metabolomics may turn out to be a “the more we learn, the less we know” situation, and since the basic definition of a healthy diet is pretty stable, I’m more curious about how my brain reacts to different foods and sensations that come with eating.
    Thanks for the info (and the other great posts).
    Emi

  4. Emi

    I’m reading a lot about these subjects and always wondering what is the deal with my body. I suspect nutrigenomics and metabolomics may turn out to be a “the more we learn, the less we know” situation, and since the basic definition of a healthy diet is pretty stable, I’m more curious about how my brain reacts to different foods and sensations that come with eating.
    Thanks for the info (and the other great posts).
    Emi

  5. David

    You may find it useful to take a look at AyerVeda. Its a traditional health system out of India. They group people into blends of 3 main types and prescribe herbs and minor dietary changes to rebalance the system. I’ve found it quite effective. And its certainly not experimental.
    D

  6. David

    You may find it useful to take a look at AyerVeda. Its a traditional health system out of India. They group people into blends of 3 main types and prescribe herbs and minor dietary changes to rebalance the system. I’ve found it quite effective. And its certainly not experimental.
    D

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  11. Sally

    This is a very interesting area of research. However, I would suggest that more important than nutrigenomics are nutritional habits “inherited” from parents as we grow up.

  12. Sally

    This is a very interesting area of research. However, I would suggest that more important than nutrigenomics are nutritional habits “inherited” from parents as we grow up.

  13. isabella mori

    hi sally, and thanks for stopping by!

    i guess this is the old “nature vs. nurture” question. what has a greater influence, our genetic makeup or our environment?

    as far as we know so far, it looks like obesity, similar to anorexia, can have various and multiple causes, and they often interact. i suspect that the degree to which they interact, and the degree to which each cause contributes to the problem, are very different for each person. that’s one of the reasons why i find nutrigenomics so interesting – because we now have a hope of actually studying individual’s situations, rather than doing large-scale research where everything gets averaged out.

    anyway, that’s my opinion.

    why do you feel that nutritional habits play a larger role?

  14. isabella mori

    hi sally, and thanks for stopping by!

    i guess this is the old “nature vs. nurture” question. what has a greater influence, our genetic makeup or our environment?

    as far as we know so far, it looks like obesity, similar to anorexia, can have various and multiple causes, and they often interact. i suspect that the degree to which they interact, and the degree to which each cause contributes to the problem, are very different for each person. that’s one of the reasons why i find nutrigenomics so interesting – because we now have a hope of actually studying individual’s situations, rather than doing large-scale research where everything gets averaged out.

    anyway, that’s my opinion.

    why do you feel that nutritional habits play a larger role?

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